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  Texas Storms With Over 25 in. Measured Maximum Precipitation Max. precip. range:
17 storms: sorted by maximum precipitation Select Max. Precip. Range from Gauge
 
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1.  
Central Texas
August 1 to 4, 1978
Rain initiated by the remnants of Tropical Storm Amelia fell over Central Texas Aug. 1-4. Rainfall of more than 48 in. near Medina in Bandera County established a U.S. record of extreme point rainfall for a 72-hour period. A second storm resulted from the interaction of a cold front with a maritime air mass producing 32.5 in. at Albany in Shackelford County, with 23 in. during the 8 hours ending 2:00 a.m. Aug. 4. Major flooding occurred on the Medina and Guadalupe Rivers. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Thirty-three lives were lost, and total damages reportedly exceeded $110 million.
Max. Precipitation:   48.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):  

Shackelford Co., Albany
Bandera Co.

References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Schroeder and others, 1987


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2.  
East Texas and Upper Coast
July 24 to 28, 1979
Continuous, torrential rains fell in the eastern upper coast and southeastern Texas for almost 48 hours causing major flooding that closed streets and highways and forced hundreds of residents from their homes. Rainfall totals of 10-20 in. for 2 and 3 days were common. Alvin in Brazoria County recorded the maximum 24-hour rainfall on record for the United States of 43 in. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   43.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Brazoria Co., Alvin
References:   Bomar, 1980, p. 369-375

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3.  
Central Texas
September 8 to 10, 1921
Heavy rainfall over a large area in Central Texas Sept. 8-10 produced peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. Taylor in Williamson County recorded 23.98 in. during 35 hours, with 23.11 in. during 24 hours. Bucket surveys determined that Thrall had 32 in. of rain in 12 hours. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding caused the loss of at least 224 lives and resulted in property damage of more than $19 million.
Max. Precipitation:   40.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Williamson Co., Taylor
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Ellsworth, 1923, p. 1-13


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4.  
Southeast Texas See floodsafety.com.
June 6 to 9, 2001
Twenty-seven counties were declared federal disaster areas after as much as 36 in. of rainfall from Tropical Storm Allison fell on the area.
Deaths and Damage:   Twenty-three deaths occurred. Damages claimed at least 5,000 buildings, about 10,000 homes, and were assessed at about $5 billion dollars.
Max. Precipitation:   36.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston
References:   http://tx.usgs.gov/


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5.  
Central Texas
June 30 to July 2, 1932
Heavy rain June 30-July 3 on parts of the Nueces and Guadalupe River Basins produced historically significant peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. Very heavy rain fell on the upper Guadalupe River Basin west of Kerrville June 30-July 2. This rain amounted to more than 35 in. during about 36 hours at the State Fish Hatchery above Ingram. Heavy rainfall also was recorded in the Frio and Medina River Basins. Rainfall of 14 in. was measured at Bandera, Lima, and Medina in the Medina River Basin. Vanderpool, at the headwaters of the Medina River, measured 33.5 in. July 1-2. The floods in the Frio River were the highest known at that time. The heaviest rainfall on the Frio River Basin was at Rio Frio in Real County, where 24 in. was recorded July 1-2. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Flash floods were responsible for seven deaths, and property losses exceeded $0.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   35.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kerr Co., State Fish Hatchery
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 119-123; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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6.

 
Central Texas See floodsafety.com.
June 30-July 7, 2002

On June 30, 2002, a low-pressure system migrating westward from Florida combined with a flow of deep tropical moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and moved over southern Texas. The system hit a wall of high pressure and stalled over the central and south-central parts of the State. For 8 days, the storm system continued to draw moisture from the Gulf, which triggered several massive storms throughout much of the area. As much as 35 in. of rain fell during the event, with heaviest depths occurring in the Texas Hill Country northwest of San Antonio. Flooding affected about 80 counties in Texas.

Heavy rain also fell in parts of West Texas, including Abilene, where 12-14 in. of rain in the pre-dawn hours of July 6 caused flooding that required numerous evacuations. Heavy rains also caused Lake Brownwood to overflow, causing evacuations and flooding in parts of Brownwood.

The floods caused 12 deaths and damage to about 48,000 homes. Nearly 250 flood rescue calls were reported, more than 130 roads were closed, and thousands of homes and businesses lost electrical power and telephone service. Twenty-four counties were identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as Federal Declared Disaster areas—14 counties were eligible for individual assistance and 10 counties for individual and public assistance. Emergency management representatives had not yet assessed the total cost of damages.

The storms produced large volumes of runoff and as many as four flood peaks at each of many streamflow-gaging stations in the Brazos, Colorado, and Guadalupe River Basins. Record flood stages occurred at sites on the Medina River, San Antonio River, Sabinal River, and Nueces River. For the first time since it filled in 1968, Canyon Lake (northeast of San Antonio) poured over its spillway, adding to the flooding in the Guadalupe River. Emergency managers also were concerned about the 90-year-old dam at Medina Lake (west of San Antonio). Medina Lake topped its spillway and rose to within 18 in. of the top of the dam. Areas downstream from the dam were evacuated as a precaution because of the fear of dam failure.

Deaths and Damage:   Twelve deaths occurred during the flooding and damages were estimated to be about $1 billion.
Max. Precipitation:   35.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Kerr Co.
Kendall Co.
Taylor Co., Abilene
References:   http://tx.usgs.gov/


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7.  
Central and East Texas
June 28 to July 1, 1899
Rainfall centered over the Brazos River Basin averaged 17 in. over an area of about 7,000 mi2. One storm center was in Robertson County near the city of Hearne, and another was in Coryell County. Hearne reported 34 in. of rain, and Turnersville reported 33 in. Long-time residents in the area described the flood on the Brazos River as the worst in their lifetime. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   As many as 35 people died, and damage was estimated at $9 million.
Max. Precipitation:   34.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Robertson Co., Hearne
References:   Williams and Lowry, 1929; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data; Ellsworth, 1923, p. 47

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8.  
Lower Rio Grande Basin
June 24 to 29, 1954
Hurricane Alice moved inland from the Gulf of Mexico June 24. The heaviest rainfall recorded was on the Pecos River below Sheffield and its tributary, Howards Creek. On Johnson Draw (a tributary of the Devils River), a large part of the town of Ozona was severely flooded, and several people drowned. As much as 34 in. of rain was observed at two centers 22 and 40 mi north of Langtry. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   An unknown number of lives were lost in the floodwaters, particularly at Piedras Negras, Mexico, opposite Eagle Pass, Tex.
Max. Precipitation:   34.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Val Verde Co., Langtry
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1954, p. 56-57; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data; Wells, 1959d, p. 228-229


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9.  
South Texas
September 19 to 25, 1967
Rainfall produced by Hurricane Beulah caused floods of record-breaking magnitude on many streams in a 50,000-mi2 area of southern Texas and northeastern Mexico in September and October. The hurricane crossed the Texas coastline near Brownsville about daybreak Sept. 20 and dissipated in the mountains of northern Mexico Sept. 22. During Sept. 19-25, as much as 25.5 in. of rain was measured at Falls City in Karnes County. Unofficial measurements were as much as 34 in. in the Nueces River Basin. The rains produced historically significant peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   The storm covered about 39 counties in Texas, causing 44 deaths and $145 million in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   34.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Cameron Co., Brownsville
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Schroeder and others, 1974


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10.  
Colorado River Basin
September 13 to 18, 1936
Sandy and Walnut Creeks in the Colorado River Basin reached the highest stages known at the time. Rainfall exceeded 30 in. Sept. 13-18 at some locations in a large part of the Concho River Basin. In the vicinity of Fort McKavett in Menard County, more than 10 in. of rain fell Sept. 13-16. At the headwaters of Terrett Draw, about 10 mi south of Fort McKavett, 21-25 in. fell noon Sept. 15 to noon Sept. 16. A very heavy rain of 8-30 in., with 14 in. during about 2.5 hours at one location, fell on the North Llano River Basin Sept. 13-16. The maximum storm rainfall of 30.0 in. was recorded at Broome in Sterling County from 1:00 a.m. Sept. 15 to 7:00 p.m. Sept. 17. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   San Angelo in Tom Green County had extensive damage—about 300 buildings were washed away. Much of the business district and 500 homes in San Angelo were flooded.
Max. Precipitation:   30.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Sterling Co., Broome
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 52-67; Schoner and Molansky, 1956


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11.  
Gulf Coast
June 24 to 26, 1960
A tropical storm moving inland caused general rain of 8 in. or more on about 20,000 mi2. Rainfall totals of more than 30 in. were recorded at Port Lavaca during the period June 24-26.
Deaths and Damage:   Eight people drowned, and damage was estimated at $3.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   30.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Calhoun Co., Port Lavaca
References:   Rostvedt, 1965a, p. 92-95

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12.  
South-Central Texas See floodsafety.com.
October 17 to 18, 1998
Up to 30 in. of rainfall occurred in a 2-day period—about 5,000 mi2 in parts of 19 counties received at least 8 in. of rain. Thirteen streamflow-gaging stations in the Guadalupe and San Antonio River Basins recorded peak discharges equal to or greater than the 100-year peak and record-breaking peak discharges were recorded at 11 of the stations. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Thirty-two lives were lost and property damage was estimated to be $500 million.
Max. Precipitation:   30.00 in. (Hays Co.)
22.00 in. (Comal Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., San Marcos
Comal Co.
References:  

Slade and Persky, 1999
http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/FS/FS-147-99/



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13.  
East Texas and Upper Coast
September 17 to 21, 1979
Three-day rainfall totals throughout the upper coast were 8-27 in. Freeport in Brazoria County recorded 27 in. of rain.
Deaths and Damage:   Four people drowned, and damage was estimated at $8 million.
Max. Precipitation:   27.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Brazoria Co., Freeport
References:   Bomar, 1980, p. 429-436

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14.  
Guadalupe and Lower Colorado River Basins
September 9 to 11, 1952
Two to 26 in. of rain fell on a 25,000-mi2 area that formed a 100-mi-wide belt extending from Corpus Christi northwestward for 250 mi. Storm totals of 20-26 in. were concentrated in a small area in Blanco and Kendall Counties. Hye in Blanco County recorded 23.55 in. during 48 hours, with 20.70 in. during one 24-hour period. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Floods killed five people and caused an estimated $17 million in damage.
Max. Precipitation:   26.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Blanco Co., Hye
References:   Breeding and Montgomery 1954, p. 2-11; Orton, 1966, p. 1-17; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data


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15.  
South Texas and Coastal Bend
September 7 to 13, 1971
Hurricane Fern dumped heavy rainfall as it moved along the coast and inland. The heaviest rainfall was in the Coastal Bend area and extreme South Texas. Maximum recorded precipitation was 22.67 in. at Kaffie Ranch, about 27 mi southwest of Falfurrias in Brooks County. A bucket survey in Bee County indicated rainfall totals of 26 in. 2 mi south-southeast of Beeville and 25.7 in. 3 mi north of Skidmore.
Deaths and Damage:   Total flood damage from Hurricane Fern was an estimated $28.3 million.
Max. Precipitation:   25.70 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bee Co., Skidmore
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1972

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16.  
Central and East Texas
September 5 to 10, 1980
Tropical Storm Danielle produced torrential rains over a large part of Texas. Jefferson and Orange Counties had 12-16 in. of rain. In Kimble County, downpours of 25 in. caused massive flooding along the Llano River. The San Angelo area in Tom Green County had 5-9 in. of rain. The effects of Danielle were felt as far west as Big Bend National Park, where 4-8 in. fell.
Deaths and Damage:   Floodwaters damaged about 900 homes, 175 businesses, and hundreds of automobiles. Kimble, Mason, Menard, and Llano Counties had damages totaling $20 million.
Max. Precipitation:   25.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kimble Co., Junction
References:   Bomar, 1983a, p. 88-94

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17.  
Jim Wells, Nueces, Refugio, and San Patricio Counties
October 19, 1984
Strong thunderstorms along a stationary front north of Corpus Christi produced heavy downpours Oct. 19 that resulted in serious flash flooding. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Odem in San Patricio County had an unofficial total of 25 in. during a 3.5-hour period, making the event one of the largest depths for this duration in the United States.
Max. Precipitation:   25.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   San Patricio Co., Odem
References:   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1984b, p. 25

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