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  Texas Storms With 15-19.99 in. Measured Maximum Precipitation Max. precip. range:
40 storms: sorted by maximum precipitation Select Max. Precip. Range from Gauge
 
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1.  
East Texas
August 16 to 21, 1915
Rainfall was heavy ahead and east of a hurricane as it entered Texas. Rainfall continued to be moderate to heavy in the forward quadrants of the storm as it moved through East Texas June 18. Maximum recorded rainfall was 19.8 in. at San Augustine in San Augustine County 7:00 p.m. Aug. 16 to 1:00 p.m. Aug. 19.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.80 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   San Augustine Co., San Augustine
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956

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2.  
San Jacinto River Basin
November 21 to 26, 1940
The heaviest rainfall recorded in the San Jacinto River Basin was 17.46 in. at Montgomery Nov. 21-25, with 14 in. 2:00 p.m. Nov. 23 to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 24. Shepherd in San Jacinto County recorded 19.68 in. Nov. 21-25, with 16 in. 2:00 p.m. Nov. 23 to 2:00 p.m. Nov. 24.
Deaths and Damage:   Highways and railways were damaged greatly, and livestock worth many thousands of dollars drowned.
Max. Precipitation:   19.68 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   San Jacinto Co., Shepherd
References:   Breeding, 1948b, p. 62-69; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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3.  
Gulf Coast
August 26 to 29, 1945
The tropical disturbance produced heavy rains on the Texas coast. The extremely slow movement of the tropical disturbance produced heavy rainfall. Maximum recorded storm rainfall was 19.6 in. at Hockley in Harris County 7:00 a.m. Aug. 26 to 1:00 p.m. Aug. 29.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.60 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Hockley
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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4.  
Most of Texas
August 30 to September 5, 1932
Flooding was disastrous over much of Laredo, Piedras Negras, and Eagle Pass. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.50 in. (Freestone Co.)
15.50 in. (Schleicher Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Freestone Co., Fairfield
Schleicher Co., Eldorado
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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5.  
Texas and Adjacent States
April to June 1957
Total rainfall on much of the eastern two-thirds of Texas for the 3-month period exceeded that normally recorded for a 12-month period. These rains effectively broke the infamous 1950s drought. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.32 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Palo Pinto Co., Brazos
References:   Yost, 1963, p. 5-9


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6.  
Scurry and Adjacent Counties
June 19 to 20, 1939
Rainfall of 4-19 in. fell during 4-10 hours on an area of about 1,000 mi2 near Snyder in Scurry County.
Deaths and Damage:   The resulting flood on the Colorado River and its tributaries caused one death and damage was estimated at $350,000.
Max. Precipitation:   19.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Scurry Co., Snyder
References:   Breeding and Dalrymple, 1944, p. 104-105

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7.  
Edwards Plateau
May 15, 1951
Maximum recorded rainfall of 19 in. occurred at Sabinal in Uvalde County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   19.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Uvalde Co., Sabinal
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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8.  
Montgomery County  
May 29, 1995
Up to 19 in. of rainfall caused flooding on Cypress and Spring Creeks and the West and East Forks of San Jacinto River. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   About 16,000 homes were damaged and 22 flood deaths were reported.
Max. Precipitation:   19.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Montgomery Co., Conroe
References:   None

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9.  
Central and East Texas
December 1 to 6, 1913
Rainfall for the last 10 days of November averaged 4.21 in., Guadalupe River Basin; 3.74 in., Colorado River Basin; 3.53 in., Brazos River Basin; 2.98 in., Trinity River Basin; and 4.05 in., San Antonio River Basin. These rains laid the foundation for floods greater than any known at that time. Rains for first few days of December were more or less continuous but were heaviest Dec. 2-4. Rainfall Dec. 1-6 averaged 4.78 in., Guadalupe River Basin; 3.95 in., Colorado River Basin; 5.37 in., Brazos River Basin; 5.30 in., Trinity River Basin; and 2.94 in., San Antonio River Basin. About 85 percent of the rain fell Dec. 2-4. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Flooding resulted in 177 deaths, and losses exceeded $8.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   18.80 in. (Hays Co.)
14.07 in. (Travis Co.)
13.78 in. (Williamson Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., San Marcos
Travis Co., Austin
Williamson Co., Leander
References:   Ellsworth, 1923, p. 46-47

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10.  
Central Texas
June 10 to 15, 1935
Heavy rain over the Colorado and Nueces River Basins caused flooding greater than any known before. The Llano and West Nueces Rivers experienced extraordinary floods. There were few official rain gages in the area, but unofficial records were compiled from many sources. Heavy rain of 4-12 in. fell during 24 hours. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   No loss of life was reported. Flooding caused damage of $20 million.
Max. Precipitation:   18.30 in. (Kimble Co.)
17.60 in. (Edwards Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Kimble Co., Segovia
Edwards Co., Carta Valley
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Dalrymple and others, 1939, p. 236-240


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11.  
San Marcos Vicinity
May 14 to 15, 1970
Rainfall depths to at least 18 in. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Two deaths and about 400 homes flooded in the San Marcos area.
Max. Precipitation:   18.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., San Marcos
Caldwell Co.
References:   John Patton, National Weather Service, written commun., 1999

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12.  
Rio Grande Watershed
June 24 to 30, 1971
The rains ended a severe drought that had affected the area for several months. Reservoirs were less than one-third of conservation capacity. During the 7-day period, rainfall averaged about 9 in. on the entire watershed between Amistad Dam and Falcon Dam. El Indio in Maverick County recorded 16-18 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   18.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Maverick Co., El Indio
References:   International Boundary and Water Commission, 1971, p. 95-97

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13.  
South-Central Texas
June 21 to 22, 1997
Up to 18 in. of rainfall occurred in a 2-day period on an area covering parts of 18 south-central Texas counties. Record-breaking peak discharges were recorded at eight streamflow-gaging stations in the area. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   The total property damage for which owners were eligible for disaster assistance was about $10.4 million.
Max. Precipitation:   18.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Kendall Co., Sisterdale
References:   Raines and others, 1998


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14.  
North-Central Texas
April 5 to 30, 1942
The largest amounts of rainfall occurred in Tarrant and Cooke Counties. Tarrant County had nearly 17 in. of rain while Cooke County had about 16.5 in. The highest daily total, 5.7 in., occurred in Cooke County on the 25th.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   17.00 in. (Tarrant Co.)
16.50 in. (Cooke Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Ft. Worth
Cooke Co., Gainesville
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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15.  
Navarro, Hill, Ellis, and Johnson Counties
April 20 to May 2, 1966
A series of flood-producing rains of 8-15 in. fell on Chambers Creek watershed Apr. 20-May 2. Rainfall of 7.91-14.75 in. was recorded. Unofficial reports of rainfall indicate that isolated areas of the watershed had as much as 17 in. The greatest rainfall was reported for the area immediately west of Corsicana.
Deaths and Damage:   Storm damage was estimated at $441,000.
Max. Precipitation:   17.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Navarro Co., Corsicana
References:   Soil Conservation Service, 1966a

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16.  
Most of Texas
July 20 to 30, 1902
Rainfall depths up to 17 in. over much of the State causing flooding throughout Texas.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage estimated at $5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   16.90 in. (Bell Co.)
13.49 in. (Mitchell Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bell Co., Temple
Mitchell Co., Colorado City
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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17.  
Harris County
December 6 to 8, 1935
Torrential rains in Harris County Dec. 6-8 caused large rises in Buffalo and Whiteoak Bayous. Houston reported 5.52 in., and Satsuma in northwestern Harris County reported 16.49 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Eight people drowned in the flooding, and property damage was estimated at $ 2.5 million.
Max. Precipitation:   16.49 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Satsuma
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1939, p. 276-280; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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18.  
Coastal Plain
September 12 to 16, 1951
Rain of 5-21 in. fell on an area greater than 26,000 mi2, including all of Texas south of latitude 29° and east of longitude 99°. From 7:00 to 10:00 a.m. Sept. 13, 7.65 in. was measured.
Deaths and Damage:   Floods caused an estimated $1.5 million in damage, and 1,300 people were evacuated.
Max. Precipitation:   16.30 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Jim Wells Co., Alice
References:   Wells, 1957, p. 288; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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19.  
Southeastern and South-Central Texas
August 31, 1981
Heavy storms caused considerable flooding in more than a dozen counties in southeastern Texas from Brooks County in southern Texas to as far north as Caldwell and Bastrop Counties. About 20 in. was recorded in the Lavaca River Basin. Karnes City in Karnes County had 16.29 in. of rain during a 24-hour period. Unofficial totals were as much as 19 and 21 in. in other parts of the State. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Flash flooding from the rains killed five people and caused millions of dollars in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   16.29 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Karnes Co., Karnes City
References:   Bomar, 1982

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20.  
North-Central Texas
November 5 to 9, 1918
The largest amounts of rainfall occurred in Erath and Bosque Counties. In a 24-hour period from the 7th to the 8th, the city of Kopperl in Bosque County recorded 7.6 in.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   16.21 in. (Erath Co.)
11.59 in. (Erath Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Erath Co., Stephenville
Erath Co., Dublin
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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21.  
Southwest Texas
October 4 to 5, 1986
In northern Val Verde County, 10-15 in. of rain Oct. 5 caused severe flooding on the Devils and Dry Devils Rivers. McCamey in southwestern Upton County reported 16.21 in. during 24 hours.
Deaths and Damage:   One drowning occurred when a car was washed off a road.
Max. Precipitation:   16.21 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Upton Co., McCamey
References:   Carr and others, 1990, p. 18

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22.  
Brown County
April 25, 1990
As much as 16 in. of rain fell during a 24-hour period. Brownwood Airport measured 16.05 in. Flooding was the worst in the Brownwood area since 1954.
Deaths and Damage:   About 1,300 people were evacuated from low-lying areas of Brown County. Floods caused millions of dollars in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   16.05 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Brown Co., Brownwood
References:   Paulson and others, 1993, p. 26

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23.  
San Antonio
September 26 to 27, 1946
Heavy rainfall was recorded for the 2-day period. The center of the storm extended from southern San Antonio south and southeast about 20 mi. More than 16 in. of rain fell on this 110-mi2 area, with 6.61 in. recorded 8:00 p.m. Sept. 26 to 4:00 a.m. Sept. 27. San Antonio Municipal Airport recorded 6.93 in., with 6.61 in. 8:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m.
Deaths and Damage:   The flood spawned by the storm resulted in the loss of several lives and much property damage around San Antonio.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Bexar Co., San Antonio
References:   Breeding, 1947, 1948a; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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24.  
Trinity, Brazos, Colorado, Guadalupe, Nueces River Basins
September 28 to October 4, 1959
As much as 12 in. of rain caused extensive flooding in the upper Trinity River Basin on Big Fossil, Big Sandy, Chambers, and Richland Creeks and produced historically significant peak discharges at several streamflow-gaging stations. In the middle Brazos River Basin, floods (exceeding all previously known) on North Bosque River and Cowhouse Creek followed rain totaling more than 14 in. at some places. Spring Creek in the middle Colorado River Basin reached its highest stage since 1882 following rainfall that exceeded 10 in. Johnson Creek, in the headwaters of the Guadalupe River, recorded the second highest flood known since at least 1852. Flash flooding on the upper Nueces River Basin followed heavy rain Oct. 3-4. Unofficial totals of as much as 16 in. of rain were reported.
Deaths and Damage:   One person drowned during the flood. Big Fossil Creek flooded parts of Richland Hills, a suburb of Fort Worth, causing an estimated $300,000 in damage. Damage to agricultural interests and rural public properties was estimated at $700,000 by the U.S. Weather Bureau.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Tarrant Co., Fort Worth
References:   Asquith and Slade, 1995; Hendricks, 1964b, p. 70-74

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25.  
New Braunfels
May 11 to 12, 1972
During a 4-hour period, 16 in. of rain fell in the San Marcos area in Hays and Caldwell Counties. The National Weather Service reports that about 12 in. of rain fell in about 1 hour. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Seventeen lives were lost to the rampaging floodwaters that inundated 400 homes and caused about $17.5 million in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., San Marcos
Caldwell Co.
References:   Colwick and others, 1972

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26.  
South-Central Texas
August 22, 1998
Up to 16 in. of rainfall in south-central Texas caused flooding in many counties, with the city of Del Rio receiving the worst damages. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Thirteen lives were claimed.
Max. Precipitation:   16.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Val Verde Co., Del Rio
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999


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27.  
Central and East Texas
April 29 to May 5, 1944
This large storm covered much of Central and East Texas with rainfall depths up to 15 in. The largest depths occurred in the areas of Jackson Hill, Gary, Beaumont, Waco, Lake End, and Whitecliffs.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.91 in. (Sabine Co.)
15.70 in. (Sabine Co.)
15.68 in. (Panola Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Sabine Co., Jackson Hill
Sabine Co., Bronson
Panola Co., Gary
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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28.  
Central Texas
July 13 to 18, 1900
Heavy rainfall in the Guadalupe River Basin caused about a 75-year flood peak near Comfort, Texas.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.85 in. (Galveston Co.)
13.28 in. (Kerr Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Galveston Co., Galveston
Kerr Co., Kerrville
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data


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29.  
Gulf Coast
September 10 to 12, 1961
The eye of Hurricane Carla crossed the Texas coastline at 3:00 p.m. Sept. 11. Relatively low-intensity rain fell the entire 3-day period. Storm rainfall was 15.32 in. at Galveston, and 11.66 in. at Conroe.
Deaths and Damage:   At least 32 people lost their lives. Damage from this destructive storm was an estimated $408 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.32 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Galveston Co., Galveston
References:   U.S. Geological Survey, unpub. data

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30.  
Panhandle and South Texas
October 21 to 25, 1914
Rains were unusually heavy in southwestern Texas resulting in damaging floods on the Rio Grande and the San Antonio and Guadalupe Rivers.
Deaths and Damage:   Damage was estimated to be about $72,000.
Max. Precipitation:   15.20 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Refugio Co., Austwell
References:   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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31.  
Central and East Texas
April 20 to 26, 1915
Rainfall up to 17 in. in North and East Texas caused flooding in the Trinity, Brazos, Colorado, and Guadalupe River Basins.
Deaths and Damage:   More than 40 lives were lost and property damage was estimated at $2.33 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.10 in. (Cameron Co.)
12.20 in. (Van Zandt Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Cameron Co., Cameron Park
Van Zandt Co., Grand Saline
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, unpub. data

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32.  
Central and Coastal Texas
May 24 to 31, 1929
Rainfall up to 15.0 in. caused flooding throughout much of the State.
Deaths and Damage:   Much of the damage was in Houston with an estimated cost of $6 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in. (Hays Co.)
12.90 in. (Tyler Co.)
12.20 in. (Harris Co.)
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hays Co., Driftwood
Tyler Co., Rockland
Harris Co., Houston
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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33.  
South Texas
September 4 to 6, 1933
A hurricane moved across the Gulf and struck the southern Texas coast during the night Sept. 4. Rainfall was heavy immediately ahead and east of the hurricane as it moved inland over southern Texas during the night Sept. 4 and early morning Sept. 5. Maximum recorded storm rainfall was 15.0 in. at Mercedes in Hidalgo County.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hidalgo Co., Mercedes
References:   Schoner and Molansky, 1956

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34.  
Most of Texas
September 25 to 28, 1936
The most intense rain was 15 in. near Kaufman in the Trinity River Basin. Heavy rain of 6-15 in. fell on a relatively small area of the Brazos River watershed upstream of Waco. The greatest amount, 15 in., fell at Hillsboro in Hill County. Rain of 6-10 in. fell on a small area of the Colorado River Basin between Marble Falls and Burnet in Burnet County. The rain caused Hamilton Creek to rise higher than at any other time since 1884. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hill Co., Hillsboro
References:   Dalrymple and others, 1937, p. 52-67


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35.  
Northwest Texas
May 13 to 19, 1951
Heavy thunderstorms May 13-19 produced floods of unusual magnitude on a wide area in western Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. In Texas, Palo Duro Creek Basin, a tributary of Prairie Dog Town Fork Red River northwest of Hereford, had 11 in. of rain. The maximum recorded rainfall was 15 in. at Conway, east of Amarillo.
Deaths and Damage:   Five persons lost their lives in flood waters, and estimated damage exceeded $2 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Potter Co., Conway
Randall Co.
References:   Wells, 1954

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36.  
Upper Brazos River Basin
September 24 to 25, 1955
Most of the rain fell in less than 24 hours. The storm was widespread, but small areas had heavy rainfall with depths of 10-15 in. The heaviest rainfall recorded was 15 in. west of Justiceburg.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Garza Co., Justiceberg
References:   Wells, 1962, p. 127-129

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37.  
Southeast Texas
June 12 to 13, 1973
A massive storm in the area of Houston, Liberty, and Conroe produced 10-15 in. of rain.
Deaths and Damage:   About 10 deaths occurred and about $50 million in damages.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Houston
References:   Dallas Morning News, 1999

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38.  
Trans-Pecos Region
September 24 to 25, 1978
Tropical Storm Paul produced 4 to 8 in. of rain in the western and southern Trans-Pecos region. As much as 15 in. fell in and around Guadalupe National Park Sept. 25. The rain deluged northern Mexico and filled reservoirs there to levels that mandated record releases down the Rio Conchos into the Rio Grande at Presidio, causing the worst flooding along the Rio Grande in 74 years.
Deaths and Damage:   Unknown
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Major Storm
Storm Center(s):   Hudspeth Co., Guadalupe National Park
Culberson Co.
References:   Bomar, 1979, p. 32-33

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39.  
Southeast Texas
August 5 to 12, 1980
Almost all of the southern one-fourth of Texas had at least 5 in. of rain from Hurricane Allen. Three-day rainfall totals exceeding 15 in. were reported in parts of Jim Wells and Hidalgo Counties and around Aransas Pass.
Deaths and Damage:   Three people drowned in the storm surge, and damage to property was estimated at $650-700 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in.
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   San Patricio Co., Aransas Pass
Nueces Co.
References:   Bomar, 1983a, p. 84-88

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40.  
Upper Coast and North Texas
May 16 to 19, 1989
Houston Intercontinental Airport recorded 10.28 in. May 17-18. Spring recorded more than 15 in. during a 24-hour period May 17-18. read more...
Deaths and Damage:   Widespread rains caused flooding that resulted in five deaths and total damages of about $50 million.
Max. Precipitation:   15.00 in. (Harris Co.)
10.28 in. (Harris Co.)
Severity:   Catastrophic
Storm Center(s):   Harris Co., Spring
Harris Co., Houston Intercontinental Airport
References:   Griffiths and others, 1990, p. 38-40

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